Stevenson Launching Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering Program

Stevenson Launching Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering Program
<span>Stevenson University has received approval from the Maryland Higher Education Commission to add Biomedical Engineering to its complement of science and technology undergraduate programs. The Bachelor of Science Biomedical Engineering program will appeal to students seeking careers that enhance human health through the application of engineering...</span>

Stevenson University has received approval from the Maryland Higher Education Commission to add Biomedical Engineering to its complement of science and technology undergraduate programs. The Bachelor of Science Biomedical Engineering program will appeal to students seeking careers that enhance human health through the application of engineering principles, methods, and technologies.

“This program builds on the strengths of our existing science and math programs and is structured to prepare students to meet the challenges of an ever-changing world in a variety of medical and scientific fields,” said Meredith Durmowicz, Dean of Stevenson’s Beverly K. Fine School of the Sciences.

The biomedical engineering field has grown swiftly in recent years, fueled by breakthroughs in medical research and engineering technologies. It has become an integral part of global efforts to deliver more effective and efficient medical care through enhanced diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, the development of new medical technology and devices, and the improvement of healthcare systems.

The demand for biomedical engineers will continue to expand as the pace of technological innovation increases, new medical technologies and devices are brought to market, and the aging population expands. With Stevenson’s career focus, Biomedical Engineering students will be poised to fulfill this demand across a wide spectrum of industries such as rehabilitation engineering, medical and bioinformatics, biomaterials, tissue engineering, and others. In addition, the program can offer a springboard for students who want to pursue graduate studies in applied or basic research and graduate health professions such as medicine, physical therapy, pharmacy, and others.

“Stevenson’s program emphasizes critical and creative thinking in addition to developing students’ technical skills and knowledge,” Durmowicz added. “A strong foundation in basic sciences and math—including biology, chemistry, physics, and data analysis—coupled with specific biomedical engineering coursework will give our students the broad interdisciplinary background necessary to identify needs and solve problems related to healthcare.”

Source: www.stevenson.edu